Internet Safety for Kids (Internet Safety Tips Book 1)

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  1. Teaching Digital Citizenship: 10 Internet Safety Tips For Students (With Cyber Safety Posters)
  2. The Parents Guide to Internet Safety, Security and Screen Time for Kids
  3. How do I keep my children safe online? What the security experts tell their kids
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Never send private photos or videos of yourself to anyone whether you know them in real life or not. Anyone can pretend to be anyone on the web. YAPPY is a useful acronym to help you remember the personal information you should not share online…. Even if you think these are private. You can read more about digital footprints and explore a poster with 10 tips in this post. You cannot believe everything you read or see online.

Publishing online is easier than ever so there is a lot of inaccurate or biased information out there. When you come across information, question who wrote the message and why it was created. Find more advice about evaluating websites here. There are things adults can do to deal with cyberbullying or inappropriate online behaviour:. Tempting as it is, avoid using the same password for all your accounts. You need to use a password that you can remember but is not easy to guess.

Even your best friends! Be polite and respectful online just as you would be offline. Always treat others the way you like to be treated. Life is all about balance. Here are 11 posters summarising the digital citizenship and internet safety tips. I hope these are useful to use in your classroom! Click here to download a PDF copy.

Teaching Digital Citizenship: 10 Internet Safety Tips For Students (With Cyber Safety Posters)

There are many digital citizenship resources available online for educators, parents, and students. The following sites are particularly useful, and I have also curated more on a Pinterest board. An Australian government site with lots of resources for educators, parents, and children. Also includes a complaints service.

The classroom resources section has helpful multimedia and lesson plans for primary and secondary school educators. Resources such as videos, games, and presentations for children, educators, parents, and law enforcement. The teaching resources section has some useful lesson plans, presentations, and tip sheets.

You do need to register for a free account to access these. Another useful discussion starter from Google for older students or staff is their Phishing Quiz phishing is an attempt to trick you into giving personal information by pretending to be someone you know or recognise. Common Sense Media reports that children are accessing devices and the internet at increasingly younger ages, well before coming to school. The amount of time young people are spending on screens is also increasing to a significant amount — about 6 hours a day for tweens and 9 hours a day for teens.

Along with learning about opportunities, children need to learn about the responsibilities that come with using technology. When students develop habits and behaviours without guidance, problems are sure to occur. My hope is that teaching students some key messages from a young age will help them navigate their way safely through the online world as they grow older. Digital citizenship education is an ongoing process, and the work of one teacher is not enough.

Ideally, we need parents, students, educators, community members, and school leaders to unite. Most of all, we need to create a positive culture where students feel empowered to use technology safely and purposefully. As ISTE tells us,. Fill out the form below or simply click here to find the sign-up form in your browser. Thank you for your hard work.

5 Internet Safety Tips for Kids

I work in a library and have been put in charge of teaching digital literacy. I have actually used some of your handouts with a class I taught. I hope to hang some of the posters in the computer areas as a reminder to everyone. It is not my fault if I get a message like that. If I do I will tell my parents right away.

‘If you wouldn’t do it face to face - Don’t do it online’

I will talk with my parents so that we can set up rules for going online and using a mobile phone. We will decide upon the time of day that I can be online, the length of time I can be online and appropriate areas for me to visit.

The Parents Guide to Internet Safety, Security and Screen Time for Kids

I will not access other areas or break these rules without their permission. The teaching resources section has some useful lesson plans, presentations, and tip sheets. You do need to register for a free account to access these. Another useful discussion starter from Google for older students or staff is their Phishing Quiz phishing is an attempt to trick you into giving personal information by pretending to be someone you know or recognise.

Common Sense Media reports that children are accessing devices and the internet at increasingly younger ages, well before coming to school. The amount of time young people are spending on screens is also increasing to a significant amount — about 6 hours a day for tweens and 9 hours a day for teens. Along with learning about opportunities, children need to learn about the responsibilities that come with using technology.

When students develop habits and behaviours without guidance, problems are sure to occur. My hope is that teaching students some key messages from a young age will help them navigate their way safely through the online world as they grow older. Digital citizenship education is an ongoing process, and the work of one teacher is not enough. Ideally, we need parents, students, educators, community members, and school leaders to unite.

Most of all, we need to create a positive culture where students feel empowered to use technology safely and purposefully.

As ISTE tells us,. Fill out the form below or simply click here to find the sign-up form in your browser. Thank you for your hard work. I work in a library and have been put in charge of teaching digital literacy. I have actually used some of your handouts with a class I taught.

How do I keep my children safe online? What the security experts tell their kids

I hope to hang some of the posters in the computer areas as a reminder to everyone. Your posts make it easy yet informative.


  1. Five Practices of Fruitful Youth Ministry: A Youth Leaders Guide!
  2. ‘Start discussing online safety at an early age’.
  3. Dieu la Conscience (Le projet de la Conscience de Dieu t. 1) (French Edition).
  4. Micromegas ; Le monde comme il va ; Jeannot et Colin (Petits Classiques Larousse t. 76) (French Edition).

Hi Beth, Thank you for your kind comment! It really makes me so happy to hear that others are finding my resources useful! I have happened to stumble apon your blog and twitter and wanted to say that I enjoy all of the concepts you have discussed on both.

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This specific post is about a concept we discussed in my class and I find how you described it very good and I found the posters attached very helpful especially for younger students. Thank you for sharing your ideas with the rest of the world! So great to hear from you. Good luck with the rest of your course. Save my name, email, and website in this browser for the next time I comment. Notify me of followup comments via e-mail. Digital Citizenship. This post was first published in It was updated in March, Scroll down to find a set of 11 summary posters.